NUX – April15 – 10 UX Testing Tips from Lee Duddell of What Users Do

Lee Duddell, Founder & UX Director of What Users Do was kind enough to take the stage at our second Northern User Experience (NUX) – Newcastle event and provide top tips on getting started with Remote Usability Testing.

Lee walked us through 10 top tips from getting started, planning a test, and analysing the results whilst providing insight from real test videos.

Top 10 tips 

top 10 tips for UX testing -  Other suggestions for Tip10 were:

  • Test competitor websites or different sectors to find out what works and why
  • When constructing a regular testing panel,watch out for testers becoming too comfortable & critiquing instead of using it naturally. We want to observe behaviour when completing a task, not listen to opinions. 
  • You are not geographically  restricted when it comes to finding participants so can test around the world to see if their are cultural differences. 

Some parting advice  (Thanks @R8v3N for the photo)

Lee’s slides and full write up can be found over on the What Users Do Blog:

Checkout fail: making your customer sign up to your newsletter

It’s common to see pre-checked newsletter sign ups (bad) but I must admit, this is a first for me – being made to sign up for the company’s newsletter in order to continue to checkout and purchase my items!

Mandatory newsletter

Also ironic that the checkout is named ‘Instant checkout’. Not so “instant” if you don’t sign up for the newsletter.

Creative wording continues when we reach the T&Cs….


Overall this was such as shame as their lovely customer service department called the next day and they couldn’t have been more helpful. So disappointing that their website is letting them down.

On the plus side this has reminded me of the amazing Google video recreating online checkout in real life.

UX Gold: That moment your Disney MagicBand turns green

Disney have recently introduced RFID tag bracelets called MagicBands into their parks and hotels to improve the customer experience (and obviously gain a wealth of data about their customers location and behaviour).

There’s an incredible moment of satisfaction in using your magic band for the following reasons:

  1. It’s a wearable – it’s novel, it’s cool, you feel like have magic powers
  2. You feel privileged – only those staying in Disney hotels and those willing to pay for a magic band are in your elite group.
  3. The suspense – when the reader is checking your band, you see the Mickey circle spin and there’s always that moment of doubt that crosses your mind that you’ve made a mistake, it’s not your time to ride Big thunder mountain! Then it turns green and you feel marvelously triumphant!

Demo video

Watch this video for a very long (but detailed) demo of most the things you can do with a Magicband.

Photo thanks to: